The Perception of Deception – Letting Go

“We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the life that is waiting for us.” Joseph Campbell

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Life is about silently letting go of everything that no longer serves our greatest potential of being. This is one of the most profound and difficult lessons in life, knowing when to let go of all that is holding us back, keeping us stagnant, or bringing us down to a level less than who we truly are. It takes a certain level of strength, negotiation, and discrimination to know exactly what we need to sever out of our lives, when the situation or relationship has served its purpose, no longer benefiting us. This has been a re-occurrent theme throughout my life; letting go of all that I no longer need, as metaphorically the lighter your baggage, the farther you will be able to travel in life. 

The perception of deception is how we deceive ourselves in life, through perceiving situations and people erroneously. However, once we are able to alter our perception through awareness, we ‘wake up’ to the present reality. Recently, this metamorphosis occurred in my own life, as if I had been asleep navigating my way through life, to suddenly ‘wake up’. It seems, through invoking a much greater discriminative power than I previously had access to, I woke up to a very clear and utterly transparent realization of the life I was living. I was starkly confronted with the reality that one cycle of life had been completed, while a very different cycle had begun.

I realized that the liminality of my previous life had come to a closure, leaving me with the assertion that the person I had become was no longer interested in continuing certain patterns that I had previous enacted. These areas encompassed dynamics with certain friends and family. Although, most of the acute realizations had been within my barometer of awareness for a very long time. Such as, how my family had bestowed certain ascribed attributes upon me as an indicator of who I was suppose to be, which is one of the most common familial practices. However, within the jurisdiction of my family allotting a sense of identity upon me – was akin to becoming a deterministic prisoner to a persona – completely irrelevant to who I am. Like many familial practice, the identity ascribed to me represented the abject of a complete stranger; someone I had never been, nor will ever be. 

Moreover, I refuse to allows others to dictate who I am supposed to be. This is primarily due to the very fact that I see my life as my own, not trapped by the limitations imposed on me by family or anyone else. It takes a certain degree of critical thinking and discrimination to understand the mechanisms of entrapment, which exist in everyone’s lives, in various forms. In my own life, I have never easily submitted to others attempts of trying to control, manipulate, or limit me through their own issues. Even though, I have always been aware that such patterns were taking place with certain individuals. However, at this juncture in my life I fully realize that I would rather not engage with such individuals, regardless of who they are. Thus, it is in my best interest to save my energy for more productive pursuits.

In essence, perhaps this ‘wake up’ was really a coming home to myself through the deeper sense of self-empowerment that I feel. Even though, it has taken until now to reach this destination of strength and discrimination; to clearly, rationally, and calmly see what is beneficial to me and what is not. Hence, as we grow through the experiential reality of life, there will always be revelations of small ‘truths’ along the way. Inevitably, life forces us to learn detachment through infinite lessons in letting go of all that no longer serves us any longer, thus providing a lighter journey forward.

© All Rights Reserved 2013

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2 responses

  1. Hi Ameya

    Other tags: acceptance of reality, first impressions, and free will. Interesting to think that free will playes a much smaller role in our own lives that we realise, as so much is determined by the circles we are born in/are in/gender/biology/and other cultural stereotypes. Keep up the good work following your interests.

    • Sarah,

      Thank you for your feedback on adding additional tags, its very helpful. I think that free will is determined by our level of consciousness in relation to our identity, through our perception of ‘self’. If our identity is heavily associated with our family and cultural ambiance, then we will become much more connected to feeling this interdependent sense of ‘self’. In addition, one thing that is not mentioned in my blog, is that as a Westerner our society is very independent, verses most of South East Asia which is much more of an interdependent social culture. Therefore, as a Westerner and a spiritual seeker, who has traveled extensively through living in numerous foreign countries, this experiential knowledge has facilitated the essential development of who I am. Thus, the perception of who I see myself to be has become well defined. However, in the blog I am pointing out that we all have a certain degree of free will in choosing who to associate with in life and who not to. In addition, if that relationship is no longer serving our greatest good, or becomes an obstacle in our growth and development – we have the choice to continue the relationship – or to move on.

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